Secret society - free mason

About secret societies, free masonry, simbols, rithuals, order, ... Some articles are taken from "Mysteries of Freemasonry" by Captain William Morgan "The Symbolism of Freemasonry" by Albert G. Mackey, M.D. 1882. "Secret Societies" by David MacDill, Jonathan Blanchard, and Edward Beecher Those three books have free licence and no copyright law has broken.

Saturday, August 12, 2006

Ceremonies of Opening a Lodge of Entered Apprentice Masons

One rap calls the Lodge to order; one calls up the Junior and Senior Deacons; two raps call up the subordinate officers; and three, all the members of the Lodge.

The Master having called the Lodge to order, and the officers all seated, the Master says to the Junior Warden, "Brother Junior, are they all Entered Apprentice Masons in the South?" He answers, "They are, Worshipful." Master to the Senior Warden, "Brother Senior, are they all Entered Apprentice Masons in the West?" He answers, "They are, Worshipful." The Master then says, "They are in the East;" at the same time he gives a rap with the common gavel, or mallet, which calls up both Deacons. Master to Junior Deacon, "Attend to that part of your duty, and inform the Tyler that we are about to open a Lodge of Entered Apprentice Masons; and direct him to tyle accordingly." The Tyler then steps to the door and gives three raps, which are answered by three from without; the Junior Deacon then gives one, which is also answered by the Tyler with one; the door is then partly opened, and the Junior Deacon delivers his message and resumes his situation, and says, "The door is tyled, Worshipful" (at the same time giving the due-guard, which is never omitted when the Master is addressed). The Master to the Junior Deacon, "By whom?" He answers, "By a Master Mason without the door, armed with the proper implements of his office." Master to the Junior Deacon, "His duty there?" He answers, "To keep off all cowans and eave-droppers, see that none pass or repass without permission from the Master." [Some say without permission from the chair.] Master to Junior Deacon, "Brother Junior, your place in the Lodge?" He answers, "At the right hand of the Senior Warden in the West." Master to Junior Deacon, "Your business there, Brother Junior?" He answers, "To wait on the Worshipful Master and Wardens, act as their proxy in the active duties of the Lodge, and take charge of the door." Master to Junior Deacon, "The Senior Deacon's place in the Lodge?" He answers, "At the right hand of the Worshipful Master in the East." [The Master, while asking the last question, gives two raps, which call up all the subordinate officers.] Master to Senior Deacon, "Your duty there, Brother Senior?" He answers, "To wait on the Worshipful Master and Wardens, act as their proxy in the active duties of the Lodge, attend to the preparation and introduction of candidates—and welcome and clothe all visiting brethren." [i.e., furnish them with an apron.] Master to Senior Deacon, "The Secretary's place in the Lodge, Brother Senior?" He answers, "At the left hand of the Worshipful Master in the East." Master to the Secretary, "Your duty [Pg 4]there, Brother Secretary?" He answers, "The better to observe the Worshipful Master's will and pleasure, record the proceedings of the Lodge; transmit a copy of the same to the Grand Lodge, if required; receive all moneys and money-bills from the hands of the brethren, pay them over to the Treasurer, and take his receipt for the same." The Master to the Secretary, "The Treasurer's place in the Lodge?" He answers, "At the right hand of the Worshipful Master." Master to the Treasurer, "Your duty there, Brother Treasurer?" He answers, "Duly to observe the Worshipful Master's will and pleasure; receive all moneys and money-bills from the hands of the Secretary; keep a just and true account of the same; pay them out by order of the Worshipful Master and consent of the brethren." The Master to the Treasurer, "The Junior Warden's place in the Lodge, Brother Treasurer?" He answers, "In the South, Worshipful." Master to Junior Warden, "Your business there, Brother Junior?" He answers, "As the sun in the South at high meridian, is the beauty and glory of the day, so stands the Junior Warden in the South the better to observe the time; call the crafts from labor to refreshment; superintend them during the hours thereof; see that none convert the hours of refreshment into that of intemperance or excess; and call them on again in due season, that the Worshipful Master may have honor, and they pleasure and profit thereby." Master to the Junior Warden, "The Senior Warden's place in the Lodge?" He answers, "In the West, Worshipful." Master to the Senior Warden, "Your duty there, Brother Senior?" He answers, "As the sun sets in the West, to close the day, so stands the Senior Warden in the West, to assist the Worshipful Master in opening his Lodge; take care of the jewels and implements; see that none be lost; pay the craft their wages, if any be due; and see that none go away dissatisfied." Master to the Senior Warden, "The Master's place in the Lodge?" He answers, "In the East, Worshipful." Master to the Senior Warden, "His duty there?" He answers, "As the sun rises in the East to open and adorn the day, so presides the Worshipful Master in the East to open and adorn his Lodge; set his crafts to work with good and wholesome laws, or cause the same to be done." The Master now gives three raps, when all the brethren rise, and the Master, taking off his hat, proceeds as follows: "In like manner so do I, strictly forbidding all profane language, private committees, or any other disorderly conduct whereby the peace and harmony of this Lodge may be interrupted while engaged in its lawful pursuits, under no less penalty than the by-laws, or such penalty as a majority of the brethren present may see fit to inflict. Brethren, attend to giving the signs." [Here Lodges differ very much. In some they declare the Lodge open, as follows, before they give the sign.] The Master (all the brethren imitating him) extends his left arm from his body, so as to form an angle of about forty-five degrees, and holds his right hand traversely across his left, the palms thereof one inch apart. This is called the first sign of a Mason—is the sign of distress in this degree, and alludes to the position a candidate's hands are placed in when he takes the obligation of an Entered Apprentice Mason. The Master then draws his right hand across his throat, the hand open, with the thumb [Pg 5]next to the throat, and drops it down by his side. This is called the due-guard of an Entered Apprentice Mason (many call it the sign), and alludes to the penalty of an obligation. The Master then declares the Lodge opened in the following manner:—"I now declare the Lodge of Entered Apprentice Masons duly opened for the dispatch of business." The Senior Warden declares it to the Junior Warden, and he to the brethren. "Come, brethren, let us pray."

Prayer.—Most holy and glorious God! the great Architect of the Universe: the giver of all good gifts and graces. Thou hast promised that "Where two or three are gathered together in Thy name, Thou wilt be in the midst of them, and bless them." In Thy name we assemble, most humbly beseeching Thee to bless us in all our undertakings, that we may know and serve Thee aright, and that all our actions may tend to Thy glory, and our advancement in knowledge and virtue. And we beseech Thee, O Lord God, to bless our present assembling; and to illumine our minds through the influence of the Son of Righteousness, that we may walk in the Light of Thy countenance; and when the trials of our probationary state are over, be admitted into the temple not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. Amen. So mote it be.

Another Prayer.—Behold how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity! It is like the precious ointment upon the head that ran down upon the beard, even Aaron's beard, that went down to the skirts of his garments; as the dew of Hermon, and as the dew that descended upon the mountain of Zion, for there the Lord commanded the blessing, evermore. Amen. So mote it be. (This prayer is likewise used on closing the Lodge.)

The Lodge being now open and ready to proceed to business, the Master directs the Secretary to read the minutes of the last meeting, which naturally brings to view the business of the present. If there are any candidates to be brought forward, that is the first business attended to.

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home

privacy: